Hot Crab and Cheese Dip

I’m not a huge seafood fan, but there are two things that I will absolutely never turn my nose up at – crab cakes and my mom’s Hot Crab and Cheese Dip. Don’t be alarmed by the term “crab” in the title, for this is not a rich man’s dish. Instead, my mother made a delicious dip out of good, old, imitation crab meat from the grocery store. Now, if you’ve got the cash and want to be fancy, feel free to whip this up with real crab meat, but I honestly don’t think you’ll really be able to tell the difference. This makes a huge amount of dip, and is extremely easy and quick (less than an hour total for preparation and baking) for a dinner appetizer, party dip, or a little something to bring to a Thanksgiving party you’ll be attending tomorrow. And don’t be a “mayo vs. Miracle Whip” snob either – this just won’t be the same if you fill it with pure mayonnaise. I strongly recommend sticking with Miracle Whip, even if you’re a mayo purist.

Ingredient List
1 package (14.5 ounces) of imitation crab meat, finely chopped     [360 calories] (feel free to use real crab if you can afford it!)
1 cup Miracle Whip     [640 calories]
2 cups (16 ounces) shredded cheddar cheese     [1760 calories]
1 cup Vidalia onion, finely diced
1 tablespoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Recipe
Serves a crowd
Calories per dip: 2760

Pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees F. Spray a large casserole dish well with Pam, especially all the way up the sides of the dish. Pull apart the larger chunks of crab meat, then use a knife to finely dice.

In a large mixing bowl, combine all of the ingredients, then season to taste.

Fill casserole dish with combined ingredients, then bake for 45 minutes. If you want to get a nice crust on the top of your dip, add more cheese to the top and turn on the broiler for a few minutes once the dip is finished baking.

Serve hot with Triscuits or any other hearty cracker of your choice.

Recipe – Hot Crab and Cheese Dip – PDF Version

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This came straight from my mother’s mammoth recipe books, so there’s no telling where it originally came from. 

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